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Game to the Last

The 11th Australian Infantry Battalion at Gallipoli

Authors: James Hurst
Rated 4.60 out of 5 based on 5 customer ratings
(5 customer reviews)
01/Feb/2012
267
Hardback
9781921941139
$34.99

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The book follows the battalion members as they leave their homes and lives in Western Australia, embark for overseas service, experience the excitement and boredom of arid and exotic Egypt, and undergo their baptism of fire in the first wave of the Australian and New Zealand landings at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915. Game To the Last casts its net wide to find and tell these men’s stories and is the culmination of many years’research. Author James Hurst has visited the men’s training grounds and battlefields, homes and graves. Many previously unpublished personal accounts provide the heart of the narrative, while extensive research provides context and colour. This is a story about sons, brothers, husbands who became soldiers in a bloody war on foreign soil. Their experiences are documented and retold with admiration and respect, and remind the reader of the human face of war.

James  Hurst

James Hurst

James Hurst was born in Perth and studied at the University of Western Australia. He has since worked at the Universities of Western Australia and New South Wales and for the Department of Defence. For many years he has researched the Gallipoli Campaign in general and the 11th Battalion in particular, visiting the peninsula five […]

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5 reviews for Game to the Last

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    VERDICT: ILLUMINATES WAR’S HORRORS AND VALUE OF MATESHIP Many books have been written abou tthe Gallipoli campaign but few have knitted the personal narrative to the historical data as well as Ian McPhedran Review Daily Telegraph . First-time author James Hurst provides an enthralling account of the exploits and tragedies that befall the WEstern Australian 11th Battalion … from Perth to the blood-soaked trenches of Gallipoli. The book is a rare beast – a work of academic history with a compelling narrative. It brings the characters to life in a way that many history books fail to do. A graphic selection of images of men at war and original maps places the campaign and it’s victims in clear context.

  2. Rated 5 out of 5

    THE great Australian storyteller, A.B. Facey, had been on Gallipoli only six days short of four months and I want to say they were the worst four months of my whole life”. He was a private in Western Australia’s 11th Infantry Battalion, AIF. Facey wrote, “I had seen many men die horribly, and had killed many myself and lived in fear most of the time.” James Hurst’s book tells in great detail of the volunteers, about their homes and lives in 1149 Western Australia, about their early experiences, the novelty and then boredom of encampment in Egypt and then the horrors of that first day as they clambered up the dark, treacherous face of Gallipoli at An Burnu as part of the 3rd Brigade. The battalion was to serve to the very end of the war. By then it had suffered casualties, including killed. Hurst has done a marvellous work of meticulous research. A great insight into the psyche of men and what makes them function under the most terrifying circumstances and an appropriate introduction to Anzac Day.

  3. Rated 4 out of 5

    The end paper on this handsomely presented book states that this is the author’s first book. I very much hope that it is not his last. James Hurst has produced a history of the West Australian 11th Battalion, Australian Imperial Forces, that is the result of extensive research which has been consolidated into a well written and very readable history of the Battalion. The firsthand extracts are enthralling and certainly dispel any misconception about the glamour of war. The author has clearly demonstrated not only great scholarship in his research, but also the ability to turn masses of data into a living, breathing work that is not only extremely interesting, but also very readable.

  4. Rated 5 out of 5

    James Hurst, in his preface, writes that this book began with the search for one man, a friend of his grandmother. The story that unfolded was of over 1,000 men and boys who became part of the newly formed battalion in Western Australia and who, before long, found themselves on the beaches of Gallipoli. Ian McPhedran Review Daily Telegraph casts its net wide to find and tell these men’s stories and is the culmination of many years of research. Hurst has visited the men’s training grounds and battlefields, homes and graves. Many previously unpublished personal accounts provide the heart of the narrative, while extensive research provides context and colour. In fact his research has taken him to Gallipoli five times, so it is no surprise that he has produced a thorough, well-researched account of the battalion at Gallipoli. And his grandmother’s friend? He ended his days, like so many others, in a rough grave on a windswept hillside in Turkey.

  5. Rated 4 out of 5

    “Game to the Last gives you a ton of detail on the soldiers who made up the 11th Australian Inf. Battalion and their fate. The horrors of Gallipoli are clearly shown, and just how unlikely you were to have joined up and made through the fighting, much less all the way to Game to the Last”

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