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Nursery Crimes: Case 1

Baaa Baa Black Sheep, The Fleeced Fleece

Authors: John Barwick Illustrator: Dave Atze
(3 customer reviews)
01/Aug/2019
Nursery Rhymes, Mystery, Reluctant Readers, Humour
120
Paperback
229mm x 152mm
9781925675993
$12.50

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NURSERY RHYME WRITERS LEAVE OUT ALL THE BEST BITS … THIS SERIES UNCOVERS THE SHOCKING TRUE STORIES BEHIND THE FLUFFY LEGENDS

The Nursery Rhyme world is rife with crime! But don’t let a prissy dress and large pink bow fool you. Amateur sleuth, Little Miss Muffet, is up to any challenge. She laughs in the face of cover ups, corruption and confusingly incomplete rhymes.

Nursery Crimes reveals the terrible crimes behind our much loved nursery rhymes.

Case 1: Baaa Baa Black Sheep, The Fleeced Fleeced

Baaa Baa Black Sheep is suspicious.

What’s Farmer Fred up to?

Why is he giving all her precious black wool away? They could make a killing on the white-market!

Is Baaa Baa being fleeced?

Will the feisty Little Miss Muffet, amateur detective and world-renowned arachnid expert, solve the mystery before it’s too late?

And how did Little Bo Peep get mixed up in all this? It all sounds a bit crook …

The Nursery Crimes series doggedly takes on the cover-ups and complex web of crime and corruption in seven popular nursery rhymes and with the help of Little Miss Muffet finally unlock the secrets to these much-loved, but confusingly incomplete, rhymes.

John Barwick

John Barwick

John Barwick is a widely published author of children’s fiction, children’s non-fiction and text books. He has published over 90 titles, and been shortlisted in the CBC Book of the Year Awards and in The Australian Awards for Excellence in Educational Publishing. Born in Moruya, NSW, he now lives on the Central Coast of NSW. His leisure interests include (unsurprisingly) […]

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Dave Atze

Dave Atze

This is the story of an ordinary boy… when he was a kid everyone thought he was quite odd. Always drawing quirky things and talking in funny voices while he drew. Until one day he stumbled across a weird looking pencil stuck in a sharpener. On the sharpener it read: whomever pulleth this pencil from […]

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3 reviews for Nursery Crimes: Case 1

  1. Told in an interesting style where the narrator and an imaginary reader engage in a conversation, as though the narrator is anticipating the questions a real reader might ask, it is engaging and different and designed to appeal to the newly-independent reader who is ready to move on but would still benefit from the familiarity of known characters. It is reminiscent of the fractured fairytale format where something well-known is turned on its head and examined more closely, told from a different perspective and raises issues that might not otherwise have been thought about.

    Barbara Braxton Review
    http://thebottomshelf.edublogs.org/

  2. Cleverly illustrated by David Atze that takes it out of the realm of the usual cutsie graphics of nursery rhymes, this is fun and perfect for those who like something out of left-field.

    Barbara Braxton Review
    http://thebottomshelf.edublogs.org/

  3. Sheep go to a lot of trouble to grow their wool to keep themselves warm, but as soon as it gets to a certain length the farmer shears it off and sells it., often making a lot of money for it, particularly if it is black like Baaa Baa’s. Surrounded by high fences, spotlights and video cameras so neither she nor her wool could be stolen, Baaa Baa was fed the best food and was shorn twice a year whereas her lighter cousins were only shorn once. Once shorn the wool was stored in a closely-monitored control centre with television surveillance so it is certainly precious. So when Farmer Fred sells one of the three precious bags to the local headmaster, another to Dame Horrida and the third to Theodore Thumpnose, the local bully, when he could have got much for it at the wool market, suspicions are raised….

    This is the first of seven stories investigating the crimes in the nursery rhymes that little ones hear so often. Told in an interesting style where the narrator and an imaginary reader engage in a conversation, as though the narrator is anticipating the questions a real reader might ask, it is engaging and different and designed to appeal to the newly-independent reader who is ready to move on but would still benefit from the familiarity of known characters. It is reminiscent of the fractured fairytale format where something well-known is turned on its head and examined more closely, told from a different perspective and raises issues that might not otherwise have been thought about.

    Barbara Braxton
    Teacher Librarian
    M.Ed.(TL), M.App.Sci.(TL), M.I.S. (Children’s Services)
    Dromkeen Librarian’s Award 2003
    COOMA NSW 2630
    AUSTRALIA
    barbara.288@bigpond.com
    Together, we learn from each other
    500 Hats http://500hats.edublogs.org/
    The Bottom Shelf http://thebottomshelf.edublogs.org/
    Storybook Cushions http:// bit.ly/storybook_cushions

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